The Bauhaus was an art and design school in Germany that operated between 1919 and 1933. The school offered classes ranging from architecture and interior design, to typography and textiles. The Bauhaus were anti-ornate, and believed that form should follow function. In a similar vein to the now-popular Scandinavian style, Bauhaus artists celebrated minimalism, bold colours, and geometric shapes.

The Bauhaus school had, and continues to have, great influence on design. Here are the key features of Bauhaus design, and a few tips on how to incorporate these features into your home’s interior design.

Key Features of Bauhaus Design

Typography

The Bauhaus school placed great importance on typography as a means of communication. The school offered typography classes, where students were challenged to simplify fonts, and play with the arrangement of text – vertical, diagonal, and wrapped around other objects. These ideas were new at the time.

You probably recognise the Universal typeface designed by Bauhaus graphic designer and architect Herbert Bayer, as shown above.

Big, Bold and Bauhaus!

Credits to: https://gfsgraphicdesign.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/herbert-bayer-experimental-universal-typeface.jpg

Get the Look

Incorporate Bauhaus-style typography into your interior design with artworks featuring text. You could even pick up a print of an old Bauhaus poster, and have that framed.

Minimalism

The idea of ‘form follows function’ was at the heart of the Bauhaus school. In fact, the Bauhaus’s last director, Mies van der Rohe, summarised the school’s ethos with: ‘Honesty of construction, death to decoration.’

Not to be confused with minimalist design, the Bauhaus school worked toward creating functional art objects with design that accurately depicted their purpose. To do this, the Bauhaus favoured clean, geometric shapes, rather than intricate ornamentation.

Big, Bold and Bauhaus!

Credits to: http://www.interiorexpress.com/resize/Shared/Images/Products/Club%20Chair/ALC-3001%20Brown4.jpg?lr=t&bw=1000&w=1000&bh=1000&h=1000

Get the Look

Think about Scandinavian design: minimalist furniture, clean lines, and bold shapes. Features of Scandinavian design, such as mid-century style furniture and simplistic artworks, work well if you want to incorporate Bauhaus minimalism into your home’s décor.

Geometric Shapes

The Bauhaus loved simple shapes. Students studied Cubist artists, including Picasso, and embraced a similar geometric aesthetic in artworks, textiles and furniture. The Bauhaus believed that breaking objects down into their simplest forms helped create truly modern objects and artworks.

Big, Bold and Bauhaus!

Credits to: http://www.writedesignonline.com/kandinsky.comp-8.jpg

Get the Look

Seek out soft furnishings or other room accessories that feature bold geometric designs, such as rugs, cushions, lampshades or vases. You could even create a Bauhaus-inspired feature wall using a geometric style wallpaper. Keep in mind that Bauhaus artworks often featured geometric compositions, rather than repeated patterns.

Primary Colours

In a similar way, the Bauhaus school loved primary colours, that is, red, blue and yellow. In fact, there were entire classes dedicated to the use of colour in compositions and design objects. The primary colours are the basis of all other colours, so by using only these colours, the Bauhaus continued their tradition of simplification.

Big, Bold and Bauhaus!

Credits to: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-8zUMMsPjPuk/UqocztNgQAI/AAAAAAAAC8A/0DsmChO5vLA/s640/BauhausFoto3.jpg

Get the Look

Try incorporating the three primary colours into your interior design. Artworks that consist of only red, yellow, blue, black and white are a good place to start. You could even accessorise neutral furniture with primary coloured soft furnishings and accessories, such as placing a primary coloured table cloth on a plain, wooden table.

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HC Team
Editorial Team

The Homes Canberra Editorial team are our crack team of bloggers sourcing all sorts of great tips and advice from the property market, interior style advice and building trends

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